Ranunculus and Anemone Planting Information

Ranunculus Corms

Soak corms 4 hrs and dip in a disinfecting solution to kill any disease. Leave a trickle of water running or use an aerator to oxygenate water during soaking.

Pot up into 72 cell trays. Do not overwater in trays!

We plant in both minimally heated and unheated high tunnels. Doing this in conjuction with several planting successions means we have ranunculus blooming over the span of 3 months.

We plant our ranunculus out before it has a lot of green growth on it. You want the roots growing, but if you get cold enough like we do, then the foliage will die back.

The warmth of spring will initiate more of the foliage growth that leads to vigorous plants.

Most common pests and diseases are aphids and powdery mildew. Scouting for these weekly is a must to keep plants happy and healthy for maximum production.

If you are growing for sale of the cut flowers... Don’t undersell yourself, these babies are a lot of work! Make sure you are charging the most you can for your market and grow the colors the customer wants.

We are zone 6a here in Ohio, and we dig and replant our bulbs every year.

Anemone Corms

Anemones require a longer soaking, 12 hours, before potting up. We start them the night before, so they are ready for their disinfectant dip in the morning.  

Pot up into 72 cell trays. Do not overwater in trays!

We have had success growing anemones in beds or crates, and heated or unheated houses.

Anemones produce more stems per plant than ranunculus. Our plants generally produce continuously until heat renders them dormant, which means we can plant fewer successions of anemones than we do ranunculus.

We prefer the varieties that produce larger flowers, which means sometimes they produce fewer stems per plant. 

We are zone 6a here in Ohio, and we dig and replant our bulbs every year.